JAPAN FAQ

Climate & Weather

Spring (March – May)
The plum blossom is a good sign that the cold winter will soon end and spring is just around the corner, followed by the cherry blossom at its best in the Tokyo area between the end of March and the beginning of April to bring this beautiful season to a climax. Splendid views of mountains, fields and gardens all blanketed in gentle pink abound in this season.

Clothing: light jackets, light sweaters and other similar kinds of tops.


Summer (June – August)
The Japanese summer begins in June with a three to four week rainy season. This is an important time for farmers to plant rice. It becomes seriously hot and humid from July onward and many Japanese enjoy bathing in the sea and relaxing at cool resorts in mountainous areas. Summer is when many interesting festivals and other events are held all over the country.

Clothing: light clothes (cardigans and other similar kinds are handy, since indoors are mostly air-conditioned.)


Autumn (September – November)
Autumn always brings such freshness with a light breeze and cool temperature after the hot and humid summer. All forests are dyed in glorious autumn colors. Chrysanthemums create beautiful displays with their abundance of flowers to enchant visitors to parks and gardens. Autumn is also the season for many exhibitions, music concerts and sports tournaments in Japan.

Clothing: light jackets, light sweaters and other similar kinds of tops.


Winter (December – February)
The temperature rarely drops below 0°C in the plains along the Pacific coast during wintertime. It is also quite dry and very often sunny. Central Japan and Northern Japan are highly reputed regions for winter sports. Southern Japan is comparatively mild and pleasant in winter.

Clothing: overcoats, sweaters, etc.

 

CURRENCY/MONEY

Japans national currency is the Japanese YEN.

Japan has one of the lowest crime rates in the world and is generally a safe place to carry cash. Credit and debit cards are widely accepted at stores, restaurants and hotels in most major cities, but some smaller regional areas may only accept cash.

If you wish to use travellers’ cheques, they are accepted by leading banks, hotels, ryokan and stores in major cities.

Japan Post ATMs (JP Bank) and Seven-Eleven Convenience Store ATMs accept most international credit and debit cards for cash withdrawal, however international withdrawal fees apply.

Shinsei Bank and Citibank ATMs also accept international cards.

There is no limit on the amount of any currency that may be brought into or taken out of Japan. However, if you transport (any currencies, checks, securities or other monies) exceeding 1,000,000 yen worth in Japanese currency into or out of the country then you must complete a customs declaration. 

The unit of Japanese currency is yen. Coins are available in denominations of 1, 5, 10, 50, 100 and 500 yen and bank notes in denominations of 1,000, 2,000, 5,000 and 10,000 yen.

Japanese Notes

Japanese Coins

 

You can buy yen at foreign exchange banks and other authorized money exchangers. At the international airports, currency exchange counters are usually open during normal office hours. The exchange rate fluctuates daily depending on the money market.

Credit, debit and prepaid cards of International brands are acceptable at wide variety of merchants. There will be instances where merchants may not display the card acceptance marks so do not hesitate to ask the salesperson if your card is accepted. You can use cards for Narita Express (JR) and Shinkansen (JR) fares; however, may not use them to pay for most of short distance train/subway fares. Outside the major cities, cards not may be widely accepted. However, you can withdraw cash nationwide at ATMs in post offices and in 7-eleven stores. 

 

TIME DIFFERENCE

Standard time
NSW, QLD, ACT, VIC & TAS: Japan is 1 hour behind

NT & SA: Japan is 30 mins behind

WA: Japan is 1 hour ahead

Daylight savings time
NSW, ACT, VIC & TAS: Japan is 2 hours behind

QLD: Japan is 1 hour behind

NT: Japan is 30 mins behind

SA: Japan is 1.5 hours behind

WA: Japan is 1 hour ahead

 

ELECTRICITY AND VOLTAGE

The voltage used throughout Japan is uniformly 100 volts, A.C. There are two kinds of frequencies in use; 50 Hertz in eastern Japan and 60 Hertz in western Japan (including Nagoya, Kyoto and Osaka).

Australian appliances can be used in Japan as long as they have a travel adapter, which can be purchased at airports or in the travel section of department stores.

A 2-flat-pin plugs are used in Japan.

Please note that when purchasing electrical appliances from Japan, be sure to only purchase dual-voltage appliances such as laptop computers, digital cameras etc. Otherwise, a step-down power transformer will be required when using the Japanese appliance in Australia.

 

VISA REQUIREMENTS

Any foreign visitor who wishes to enter Japan must have a passport, which will remain valid during the period of stay.

Nationals of countries listed here are eligible to enter Japan without a visa unless the purpose of the visit is to reside in Japan, to obtain employment or to otherwise engage in remunerative activities.

Australia and New Zealand have “Reciprocal Visa Exemption Arrangements” with Japan for a period of 90 days or less.

Upon landing Australian and New Zealand passport holders will be issued with a “Temporary Visitor” entry status stamp, which allows them to stay in Japan for a period of up to 90 days for non-remunerative activities such as sightseeing, participating in amateur sports, visiting relatives, taking inspection tours, participating in lectures or research, attending conferences, making business contacts or other similar activities.

Nationals of countries that do not have “Reciprocal Visa Exemption Arrangements” with Japan must obtain a visa.

Please direct all visa-related enquiries to your nearest Consulate-General of Japan in your nearest city

 

Source:Japan National Tourism Organization

 

 

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