KHAO LAK - FAQ

Khao Lak (เขาหลัก) is a 20 km long strip of coastal resorts in Phang Nga Province on the Andaman Sea beaches of Southern Thailand, about 100 km north of Phuket Town

CLIMATE: 

The climate of the Khao Lak region is under the influence of two monsoon winds of a seasonal nature: a southwest monsoon and a northeast monsoon. The southwest monsoon starts in April when a stream of warm moist air from the Indian Ocean moves inland resulting in significant rain. It peaks in October, Khao Lak’s wettest month. Subsequent months, under the influence of prevailing northeast winds, are much drier.

Khao Lak Days with Rain, per Month
JanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDec
4 4 7 15 24 23 21 23 24 22 16 6

In simple terms, Khao Lak effectively has two seasons:

  • A rainy or southwest monsoon season (April to October). The southwest monsoon prevails over the region and abundant rain occurs. This is the year’s wettest period.
  • A dry or northeast monsoon season (November to March). Dry air moves into the region from China. This is the driest period of the year, with March being the hottest month.

From a tourist’s perspective, the dry season is the ideal time to visit Khao Lak, although rainfall numbers can be misleading. Rainfall in Khao Lak tends to occur in late afternoon/early evening, and is often of short duration. Rainy day statistics count any rainfall during a 24-hour period as a rainy day. Further confusing the issue, rainfall in Khao Lak is often highly localized, i.e., brief showers occurring at one location in the area, while everywhere else remains dry.

There is no escaping the fact that Khao Lak receives a lot of rain annually: ~3558 mm (~140 in) and as a visitor you are likely to see some of it.

GET IN

The easiest way to get to Khao Lak is to fly into either Phuket (the closest alternative) or Krabi and go to Khao Lak from there. Both airports serve international as well as domestic destinations.
A taxi from Phuket airport to Khao Lak costs 1,100-1,600 baht. The later you arrive, the more expensive the ride. Woe unto you if you have a 03:00 arrival time! If you think this is too much and prefer to take a bus (only possible during daytime), you will have to get to the main road, Highway 4, about 5 km from the airport. (This may not be easy, as the airport taxi "mafia" discourages motorbike taxi trips to the main highway or short hops to cheaper means of travel). If you manage to get to the highway, take a bus headed towards Takua Pa, Ranong or Surat Thani; they all stop on request in Khao Lak or wherever along the road you indicate. It's about 80 km from Phuket airport to Khao Lak. Bus fares vary from 80-100 baht; some are air-conditioned, others not.

FROM: http://wikitravel.org/en/Khao_Lak

 

THAILAND

LOCAL TIME

Thailand is 3 hours behind Australian Eastern Standard Time.

CURRENCY

The basic unit of Thai currency is the baht.

There are 100 satang in one baht; coins include 25-satang and 50-satang pieces and baht in 1B, 2B, 5B and 10B coins. 

Paper currency is issued in the following denominations: 20B (green), 50B (blue), 100B (red), 500B (purple) and 1000B (beige).

Banks or the more rare private moneychangers offer the best foreign-exchange rates. When buying baht, US dollars are the most accepted currency, followed by British pounds and Euros. Most banks charge a commission and duty for each travellers cheque cashed.

Current exchange rates are printed in the Bangkok Post and the Nation every day, or you can walk into any Thai bank and ask to see a daily rate sheet.

source: http://www.lonelyplanet.com/thailand/practical-information/money-costs

CLIMATE

The Thailand climate is controlled by tropical monsoons and the weather in Thailand is generally hot and humid across most of the country throughout most of the year. While Thailand’s seasons are generally divided into the hot season, cool season, and rainy season, in reality it’s relatively hot most of the year. The weather in central, northern, and north-eastern Thailand (the landlocked provinces) is determined by three seasons, whereas the southern, coastal regions of Thailand feature only two, making the weather in Thailand quite easy to understand and plan a trip around. In Thailand’s inland provinces the seasons are clearly defined: Between November and May the weather is mostly dry and the cool season and hot season occur from November to February and March to May respectively. The other inland season, the rainy season, lasts from May to November and is dominated by the southwest monsoon, during which time rainfall in most of Thailand is at its heaviest.  

The southern, coastal region of Thailand really has only two seasons – rainy season and dry season. Fortunately, for those planning a beach holiday, Thailand’s two coasts have slightly different rainy seasons, allowing visitors to find sunny beaches nearly year round.

On the Andaman or west coast, where Phuket, Krabi, and the Phi Phi Islands lie, the southwest monsoon brings heavy storms from April to October, while on the Gulf of Thailand or east coast, where Koh Samui, Koh Phangan, and Koh Tao lie, the most rain falls between September and December. 

 Cool Season (November - February)

The weather in Thailand around the central, northern, and north-eastern regions is mostly cool and dry between November and February, consequently these are the most popular months to visit Thailand.  Considering its location in the tropics however, the Thailand climate is quite warm most of the year and genuinely “cool” weather really only occurs in the northern mountains, while areas like Bangkok and Ayutthaya receive perhaps only two or three weeks of “cool” weather in late December or early January.

The southern region of Thailand really has only two seasons – “rainy” and dry, not technically experiencing “cool” weather, per se, but featuring glorious sunshine without unbearable heat, beginning in late November and continuing onto April or May.

 

Hot Season (March - June)

The weather in Thailand classified as the hot season lasts from March to June when higher relative temperatures and occasional rain are the norm.  Around the inland areas, including Bangkok and Ayutthaya, this often means punishing heat and high humidity.  The temperatures in the hot season begin climbing in February and by April the unrelenting heat makes many residents eager for the upcoming rains, which begin sporadically falling around mid-April.  This is traditionally the least popular season for travellers to visit, although the weather in Thailand is still quite nice along Thailand’s coasts.

Rainy Season (July - October)

The rainy season lasts from July to October and is dominated by the southwest monsoon, during which time rainfall in most of Thailand is at its heaviest.  However, like the “cool” season, the name “rainy season” is slightly misleading.  While it certainly does rain during this season it’s more likely to consist of flash-flood afternoon downpours than a continual drizzle for days.  If you can bear the heat and humidity, the weather in Thailand is typically sunny throughout the rainy season, but when the rain comes, its fast and it’s furious.

Fortunately for beach lovers, Thailand’s two coasts have slightly different rainy seasons, allowing visitors to find sunny beaches nearly year round. On the Andaman or west coast, where Phuket, Krabi, and the Phi Phi Islands lie, the southwest monsoon brings heavy storms from April to October, while on the Gulf of Thailand or east coast, where Koh Samui, Koh Phangan, and Koh Tao lie, the most rain falls between September and December.  While the monsoon on the west coast brings a fairly steady season of continual rain that forces businesses outside the major tourist destinations to shut their doors for the season, the east coast storms are more similar to the North’s, generally sunny days with occasionally heavy downpours.

Overall, the southern parts of Thailand, particularly the Andaman Coast, get the most rain: around 2,400 millimetres every year, compared with the central and northern regions of Thailand, both of which get around 1,400 millimetres.

 

Source http://www.tourismthailand.org/

Thailand Tourism Authority

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